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MORE INFORMATION ON ESTATE PLANNING, TRUSTS and WILLS

We also provide Powers of Attorney and Living Wills.
We encourage all of our clients to use these tools as a way to avoid
later stress and turmoil for family and loved ones.


Estate Planning:

We can help you determine if a Last Will and Testament is appropriate, or a revocable trust, or transfer of assets is more appropriate for your estate planning. Sometimes a combination of all of these tools are necessary. Our complimentary consultation is easy and you do not need to bring anything with you. Let us talk with you about your intentions and your concerns and we can formulate the best method of accomplishing your goals.
 




Last Will and Testament

A Will protects your assets and helps minimize the chances of a contest over your estate. If you die without one, it is likely your estate will not be distributed as you would choose. Use a Will to:
- Provide for your family
- Specify who you would like to receive your property
- State your funeral and burial instructions
- Create a trust for minor children
- Disinherit a person(s)
- Name a guardian for minor children

Click here to receive our Will Checklist to help in your preparation.


POWER OF ATTORNEY


An ordinary power of attorney is a legal document, signed by a competent person, which gives another person the authority to handle some or all the first person's affairs.  The first person is called the "principal. "  The individual acting on behalf of the principal is called the "agent" or "attorney-in-fact " (although he or she need not actually be an attorney).  Powers of attorney are usually prepared by lawyers.
 

A power of attorney may be very limited, covering a single transaction or event.  A power of attorney also may be very broad, giving the agent decision making power over all aspects of your financial and personal life.

A power of attorney is only valid if the principal was mentally competent when he signed it, and powers of attorney generally end automatically when the principal dies or becomes incapacitated.  In addition, the power of attorney itself may specify when it shall end -- such as the occurrence of an event (e.g., "This power shall remain in effect until I return to my residence from my trip to Paris.") or a certain date (e.g., December 25, 2008).







 

Contact Us

The Law Firm of Lorie L. Whitby is experienced at handling all legal family matters.

Professional, affordable and results oriented, contact us today to schedule your appointment.

                     

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